Book Keeping: A Reader's Community

Book Keeping: A Readers’ Commmunity

Presented by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and Sarah Crichton Books / FSG

  • The Oldest Boy by Sarah Ruhl
  • The Last Painting of Sara de Vos by Dominic Smith
  • Wray splash large
  • Save Room for Pie by Roy Blount Jr.
  • Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer

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Original thoughts on books and reading by the authors you know and love.

  • I never set out to write a memoir. Nor did I set out to become old. Apparently I have managed to do both, first the second, and then the first. Hence, Senior Moments: Looking Back, Looking Ahead, whose title was wittily suggested by one of my friends last year. I can’t remember which one, however.

  • I’ve recently been touring around giving talks and readings in bookstores, libraries, and colleges. The subject is my latest book, Now I Sit Me Down, a history of the chair. A common question from the audience is “What is your favorite chair?” I think that the implied question is actually “What is your favorite chair design?” But I prefer to answer it literally. I have come to the conclusion that what makes a chair a “favorite” is not the way it looks, or the fame of its designer, but rather the way it is used.

  • Although there’s much more research to do, playing and learning go together. Clearly, letting children play is important. But is there any more to say about the role of caregivers? Can parents somehow help children play better?

  • “You uncover a place in the scent of a dish, more absolutely than in a thousand words.”

    Jason Goodwin

  • “One day a tiger cub will crawl out of my Amazon box."

    Heather O'Neill

  • “Disable one-click before consuming alcohol. You know what I mean. Oh, yes, you do.”

    Louise Doughty

  • “All my personal writing goes back to Montaigne. ”

    Phyllis Rose

  • “Music came to me in a spotty, haphazard and completely disjointed way, and it wasn’t until I started writing a novel that begins in 1966, that I found I had suddenly tapped into one of the richest veins in American music.”

    Elizabeth Crook