Book Keeping: A Reader's Community

Book Keeping: A Readers’ Commmunity

Presented by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and Sarah Crichton Books / FSG

  • The Oldest Boy by Sarah Ruhl
  • The Last Painting of Sara de Vos by Dominic Smith
  • Wray splash large
  • Save Room for Pie by Roy Blount Jr.
  • Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer

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Original thoughts on books and reading by the authors you know and love.

  • When writing my play The Oldest Boy, which involves an American child recognized as a Tibetan tulku, I often called people in the Tibetan community for help and insight. I’ll never forget when I first wrote to an eminent Tibetan scholar, asking to have a conversation about reincarnation, and he wrote back immediately, “I am happy to talk with you, as your play might benefit other sentient beings.”

  • This is what we long for: the profound pleasure of being swept into vivid new worlds, worlds peopled by characters so intriguing and real that we can’t shake them, even long after the reading’s done. In The Last Painting of Sara de Vos, Dominic Smith deftly bridges the historical and the contemporary, tracking a collision course between a rare landscape by a female Dutch painter of the golden age, an inheritor of the work in 1950s Manhattan, and a celebrated art historian who painted a forgery of it in her youth. In this excerpt, we are introduced to the eponymous painter.

  • Who better to inaugurate our All in a Day’s Work series than John Wray, itinerant sunpatch hopper and professional novelist funnyman? As he roamed Kings County in search of inspiration and capuccinos, we asked him to record his wanderings. The result, as you see, is a prototypical Wray in the Life. John’s newest novel is The Lost Time Accidents.

  • “You uncover a place in the scent of a dish, more absolutely than in a thousand words.”

    Jason Goodwin

  • “One day a tiger cub will crawl out of my Amazon box."

    Heather O'Neill

  • “Disable one-click before consuming alcohol. You know what I mean. Oh, yes, you do.”

    Louise Doughty

  • “All my personal writing goes back to Montaigne. ”

    Phyllis Rose

  • “Music came to me in a spotty, haphazard and completely disjointed way, and it wasn’t until I started writing a novel that begins in 1966, that I found I had suddenly tapped into one of the richest veins in American music.”

    Elizabeth Crook